Opportunities

Undergraduate Learning Assistant Program

Students who have completed LS Core courses, and are interested in learning teaching skills, may apply for participation in the Undergraduate Learning Assistant Program in the Life Sciences: A Teaching Practicum in a clinic setting. This course carries 1-4 units and provides undergraduate students with the opportunity to assist their peers in learning in an instructional setting. LAs assist graduate Teaching Assistants on the teaching of LS Core courses.

We currently offer the LA program for the following courses:       LS7A      LS7B      LS7C      LS23L     LS30A     LS107

The application for all LS Core Courses can be found online:        Application

Please note that all new LAs must be able to attend the Pedagogy Seminar on Tuesdays from 4-5pm.

 

Graduate Student Teaching Assistant

The LS Core will recruit several graduate students to TA during the Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters 2018-19 in the below courses. For questions or to apply for a position, please contact the LS Core Office via email lscoreoffice_taships@lifesci.ucla.edu. Send your CV along with your undergraduate transcripts.

 

LIFESCI 7A – Cell and Molecular Biology

Course Description

Lecture, three hours; discussion, 75 minutes. Introduction to basic principles of cell structure and cell biology, biochemistry, and molecular biology. P/NP or letter grading.

 

LIFESCI 7B – Genetics, Evolution, and Ecology

Course Description

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, 110 minutes. Enforced requisite: course 7A. Principles of Mendelian inheritance and population genetics. Introduction to principles and mechanisms of evolution by natural selection, population, behavioral, and community ecology, and biodiversity, including major taxa and their evolutionary, ecological, and physiological relationships. Letter grading.

 

LIFESCI 7C – Physiology and Human Biology

Course Description

Lecture, three hours; discussion, 75 minutes. Enforced requisite: course 7B. Organization of cells into tissues and organs and principles of physiology of organ systems. Introduction to human genetics and genomics. Letter grading.

 

LIFESCI 15 – Life: Concepts and Issues

Course Description

Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Introduction to important concepts and issues in the field for non-life sciences majors. Topics include chemistry of life, genetics, physiology, evolution, and ecology — all explored in lecture and debates, with a writing component. P/NP or letter grading.

 

LIFESCI 20 – Quantitative Concepts for Life Sciences

Course Description

Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Preparation: three years of high school mathematics (to algebra II), some basic familiarity with computers. Introduction to variety of quantitative concepts that are relevant to biology. Designed to enhance quantitative skills that are essential for success in life sciences, chemistry, mathematics, and physics courses that make up core curriculum for life sciences majors at UCLA. Biological examples used throughout to gain appreciation of relevance of mathematics to biology. Letter grading.

 

LIFESCI 23L – Introduction to Laboratory and Scientific Methodology

Course Description

Laboratory, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 7B. Recommended to be taken concurrently with course 7C. Introductory life sciences laboratory designed for undergraduate students. Opportunity to conduct wet-laboratory cutting-edge bioinformatics laboratory experiments. Students work in groups of three conducting experiments in areas of physiology, metabolism, cell biology, molecular biology, genotyping, and bioinformatics. Letter grading.

 

LIFESCI 30A – Mathematics for Life Scientists

Course Description

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. Preparation: three years of high school mathematics (to algebra II), some basic familiarity with computers. Mathematical modeling as tool for understanding dynamics of biological systems. Fundamental concepts of single-variable calculus and development of single- and multi-variable differential equation models of dynamical processes in ecology, physiology, and other subjects in which quantities change with time. Use of free computer program Sage for problem solving, plotting, and dynamical simulation in laboratory. Letter grading.

 

LIFESCI 30B – Mathematics for Life Scientists

Course Description

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Enforced requisite: course 30A. Introduction to concept of matrices and linear transformations to equip students with some basic tools to understand dynamics of multivariable nonlinear systems. Examples from ecological, physiological, chemical, and other systems. Letter grading.

 

LIFESCI 40 – Statistics for Life Sciences

Course Description

This course is an introduction to Statistics designed for Life Science lower- division students. It replaces the traditional formula-based approach to statistics with an emphasis on computer simulation of chance probabilities. Simulations provide a deeper understanding of statistical concepts, and are applicable to a much wider class of distributions and estimators. Students will learn a simple programming language to carry out statistical simulations, and will apply them to the classic problems of elementary statistics. The course will develop the simulation-based approach to such traditional statistical issues as:

 

  • Null hypothesis significance testing
  • Measures of central tendency and variability
  • Confidence intervals
  • Comparing 2 groups
  • Correlation
  • Regression and ANOVA

 

LIFESCI 107 – Genetics

Course Description

Lecture, three hours; discussion, 75 minutes. Enforced requisites: courses 7C, 23L, Chemistry 14A (or 20A), 14C (or 30A). No credit for students with credit for LS 4. Advanced Mendelian genetics, recombination, biochemical genetics, mutation, DNA, genetic code, gene regulation, genes in populations. Letter grading.

 

LIFESCI 495- Preparation for College-Level Teaching in the Life Sciences

Course Description

Format: Seminar. Designed for graduate students who are teaching assistants (TAs) in the Life Sciences Core Education Department (LS Core) and should be taken concurrently with the term in which a TA is teaching for the first time in the LS Core. This course will prepare students for college-level teaching in large enrollment undergraduate courses and also will provide professional development to support students pursuing diverse careers in the Life Sciences.  Study of inclusive, student-centered, and evidence-based teaching methodologies that include active learning, group work, formative assessment, backward course design, and reflective teaching practices that incorporate peer observations and constructive feedback. Course may not be repeated for credit.

 

For questions or to apply for a position, please contact the LS Core Office via email lscoreoffice_taships@lifesci.ucla.edu

Send your CV along with your undergraduate transcripts. Thank you

Student Research Opportunities

There are many opportunities for students to participate in undergraduate research at UCLA, from the Student Research Program (SRP), to independent research projects undertaken through departmental Independent Studies courses, to research with faculty through the Center for Academic and Research Excellence (CARE). These experiences can be some of the most enriching that students have at UCLA. For more information, the contact information is:

Student Research Program (SRP)

2121 Life Sciences Building (310)794-4227
http://www.college.ucla.edu/ugresearch/index.html

Center for Academic and Research Excellence (CARE)

2121 Life Sciences Building (310) 206-2182
http://www.ugresearchsci.ucla.edu/careeligibility.htm

Independent Studies

Undergraduates may enroll in a maximum of eight units of 195-199 courses per term. PLEASE NOTE: After completing 32 units of 195-199 credit on a letter grade basis, students must take any additional 195-199 courses on a Pass/No Pass basis.

 

Most Independent field study courses (195) must be taken on a Pass/No Pass basis. Students should check with their major department for any restrictions and limitations on 195 courses.

 

See departmental listings and individual course descriptions for specific requisites and credit limitations.